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Merkel visits China February 2012

Angela Merkel visits China

2 February 2012

German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s visit to China on Thursday and Friday will be a good opportunity for her to brief China’s leaders on the outcome of the European Union summit on Monday. Merkel will also argue that it is in China’s interest to invest more in Europe.

The German chancellor will be pleased with the EU summit results, which endorsed Berlin’s long-standing wish for more fiscal discipline in EU member states. But she will still face pressure to provide more funds for struggling Greece and to take more measures to boost domestic demand.

EU-Asia Director, Fraser Cameron comments on the visit in China Daily

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China's Challenges

China's Challenges

19 January 2012

Guy de Jonquieres, Senior Fellow at ECIPE, argues that the global economic crisis has changed the perception that many Western countries shared on China. It is no longer viewed as an unruly and disruptive pupil, but rather a potential financial paymaster. Hence the aim of this paper is to identify and describe the challenges that China is facing in its new role. This paper argues that Chinese developments in all three areas are imposing increasing strains on the country’s political system and institutions and demand new approaches both inside and outside the country. The future for the country is still uncertain due to many vulnerabilities in economic, domestic and foreign policy.

Economists forecast that China’s GDP is to exceed that of the US within a decade or two. Although these predictions may get investors excited, it is also worth remembering that they are based on extrapolations of the past. Yet, challenges such as the obsolescence of growth model, the growing pressure of labour costs, and the lack of diversification lie ahead. These challenges need to be faced by a new government and policy that will balance the fiscal situation and put China back on track for fast economic growth.

The global economic crisis has changed the perception that many Western countries shared on China. It is no longer viewed as an unruly and disruptive pupil, but rather a potential financial paymaster. Hence the aim of this paper is to identify and describe the challenges that China is facing in its new role. This paper argues that Chinese developments in all three areas are imposing increasing strains on the country’s political system and institutions and demand new approaches both inside and outside the country. The future for the country is still uncertain due to many vulnerabilities in economic, domestic and foreign policy.

Economists forecast that China’s GDP is to exceed that of the US within a decade or two. Although these predictions may get investors excited, it is also worth remembering that they are based on extrapolations of the past. Yet, challenges such as the obsolescence of growth model, the growing pressure of labour costs, and the lack of diversification lie ahead. These challenges need to be faced by a new government and policy that will balance the fiscal situation and put China back on track for fast economic growth.

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Taiwan elections

EU's Muted response to Taiwan elections

15 January 2012

Taiwan\'s incumbent President Ma Ying-jeou has won a second term in office promising to further improve ties with mainland China.

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Gareth Evans

Responsibility to Protect

7 January 2012

The question of humanitarian intervention has been an issue of dispute between the EU and several Asian countries with Libya being the most recent example. Former Australian Foreign Minister and EU-Asia Centre Advisory Board member, Gareth Evans, argues that the Responsibility to Protect doctrine has made significant progress in the past decade.

Just 10 years ago, the international response to mass-atrocity crimes -- genocide, ethnic cleansing, and other large-scale crimes against humanity -- was a consensus-free zone. For all the \"never again\" rhetoric and human rights conventions launched with fanfare and sincerity after World War II, an unholy mess was made of dealing with every major man-made human catastrophe from Cambodia in the 1970s to Rwanda and the Balkans in the 1990s. Today, the ‘responsibility to protect’ doctrine, or R2P, has become a commonplace of international diplomacy, invoked in crises from the Congo to Kenya to, most notably, last year\'s struggle in Libya.

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