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Cross-Strait Relations

By Dandan Wan

10 January 2018

Tensions across the Taiwan Straits have increased since Tsai Ing-wen, the leader of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), won the presidential election in May 2016.

Instead of acknowledging the “1992 Consensus” explicitly, she referred ambiguously to “the fact of the 1992 talks”, which triggered Beijing’s suspicion of her pro-independence stance. The “1992 consensus” is generally viewed as “One China, Respective Interpretation.” Under this formula, both Mainland China and Taiwan acknowledge that they belong to one China but they can keep to their own interpretation of what exactly “China” means. It was considered as the premise for the two sides to conduct dialogue by Mainland China.

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Greece and Chinese FDI

Greece and Chinese FDI

By Plamen Tonchev

27 December 2017

In early December 2017, the Athens-based Institute of International Economic Relations (IIER) released a report, titled “Chinese Investment in Greece and the Big Picture of Sino-Greek Relations” (http://idos.gr/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Chinese-Investment-in-Greece_4-12-2017.pdf). The study, co-authored by myself and Ms Polyxeni Davarinou, attempts to shed light on what is seen by many as an emerging Sino-Greek tandem on the southeastern flank of the EU. 

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EU-Japan

EU- Japan Relations - Time for a Boost

By Fraser Cameron

11 December 2017

The EU and Japan are always viewed as like-minded partners with relations underpinned by a strategic partnership. Now both sides are moving towards a comprehensive economic partnership (EPA - more than a FTA) and a strategic partnership agreement (SPA). The former should give a much needed boost to trade relations but will the SPA be the key to a more productive political relationship?

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Australia

Australia 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper

By Ariane Combal-Weiss

8 December 2017

A new foreign policy white paper, published on 23 November 2017, highlights Australia’s growing security dilemma of having to navigate a course between an unpredictable US and a more assertive China. In his introduction to the white paper, Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull, called on Australia to be “sovereign not reliant” and “take responsibility for [its] own security and prosperity while recognising [it is] stronger when sharing the burden of collective leadership with trusted partners and friends”.

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ASEAN at 50

ASEAN at 50

By Ariane Combal-Weiss

24 November 2017

A region which can stand on its own feet, strong enough to defend itself from any negative influence from outside the region.” This is how Indonesian Foreign Minister Adam Malik envisioned ASEAN at the organisation’s inaugural conference on 8 August 1967. Faced with the threat of communism, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand agreed to establish the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to promote regional peace and prosperity. Later, five other countries Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam joined the project. Over time, the ASEAN has equipped itself with stronger institutional mechanisms to broaden cooperation in an ever-growing array of fields. This has been helpful in promoting peace and stability and fostering trust in the region, despite huge economic differences and recurring tensions between the members. ASEAN is struggling to deal with the rise of China and currently faces a major challenge in its response to the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar.

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eu asia

“It’s Asia, Stupid”: Time for the EU to Deepen Relations with Asia

By Fraser Cameron

9 November 2017

Global economic power is shifting rapidly to Asia, now the EU’s most im- portant trade partner. The EU has a vital stake in the peace and security of Asia as few of its policy goals, including climate change and preservation of the multilateral system, can be achieved without  the  positive  engagement of Asia. This is even more important because of the attitude of President Trump to Asia and global affairs. The EU thus needs to give greater priority to Asia and develop a more coherent policy approach.

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We have just seen the re-election of Shinzo Abe and Xi Jinping, leaders of Asia’s two biggest economies. Earlier this year Moon Jae-in won South Korea’s snap elections, ending a decade of conservative power. Abe and Xi are the most powerful leaders of

China, Japan, South Korea. Prospects for Détente?

By Mascha Peters

31 October 2017

We have just seen the re-election of Shinzo Abe and Xi Jinping, leaders of Asia’s two biggest economies. Earlier this year Moon Jae-in won South Korea’s snap elections, ending a decade of conservative power. Abe and Xi are the most powerful leaders of their countries in decades while Moon also enjoys no real domestic challenger. Given the fact that these three leaders will now enjoy some years of stability what does this mean for trilateral relations? Could Xi, Abe and Moon overcome the historical shadows that bedevil their relations and move their three countries down the path of reconciliation?

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china

World has a big stake in China's future

By Fraser Cameron

27 October 2017

General Secretary Xi Jinping made several references to "a new era" for China in his report to the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Among the interesting hints were China becoming more open, more welcoming of foreign investment, and being ready to play a greater international role.

The main narrative running through Xi's report was his conviction that only the CPC could lead China into the new era. He recognized that there were still many problems to overcome, including regional and wealth inequality, pollution and the quality of healthcare. He also said China would never again face a century of humiliation.

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MD

EU’s Tough Statement on Myanmar

By Ariane Combal-Weiss

17 October 2017

The EU Foreign Affairs Council this week adopted a tough statement on Myanmar talking of the “deliberate action to expel a minority” taking place in Myanmar. [1]  Although the Rohingya crisis is not new, recent months have seen a dramatic escalation of violence in the Rakhine State with over half a million Rohingya fleeing to neighbouring Bangladesh. This mass exodus was described by the UN as a “textbook example of an ethnic cleansing”.

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ch

China and the new International Order

By Tim Rühlig

1 October 2017

“China is making a path for other nations around the world who are trying to figure out not simply how to develop their countries, but also how to fit into the international order in a way that allows them to be truly independent, to protect their way of life and political choices in a world with a single massively powerful centre of gravity.”


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